Sit Down To Take a Stand

Sit Down To Take a Stand2021-11-20T16:13:06-05:00

This exhibition was made possible by:

The Rapoport Foundation

The Summerlee Foundation

With additional support from:

TFNB Your Bank For Life

Prophesy Media Group

The Institute for Oral History, Baylor University, Waco, Texas

Special Thanks to our Advisory Committee:

Anthony Betters, Sr.

Dexter Hall

Gary Myles

Stephen Sloan

Additional Thanks to:

Central Texas African-American Heritage Association

This exhibition was made possible by:

The Rapoport Foundation

The Summerlee Foundation

With additional support from:

TFNB Your Bank For Life

Prophesy Media Group

The Institute for Oral History, Baylor University, Waco, Texas

Special Thanks to our Advisory Committee:

Anthony Betters, Sr.

Dexter Hall

Gary Myles

Stephen Sloan

Additional Thanks to:

Central Texas African-American Heritage Association

The Museum has little content relating to the diverse history of our mission focus. While this is unintentional, we have the desire and responsibility to accurately reflect history, not just nostalgia, even if addressing topics that might be uncomfortable for some.

For Black Americans, soda fountains were not always welcoming places. Before the Civil Rights Movement, many restaurants were segregated, forcing Black Americans to eat in separate spaces or not receive service at all. The passive resistance of four college students at a Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina started a youth-led sit-in movement across the South. Protesters endured verbal and physical abuse while peacefully fighting for equal rights.

In Waco, Black community leaders marched, picketed, and conducted sit-ins. By demonstrating, protesters disrupted business, causing lunch counters to lose money. Locally, Black community leaders and white business owners organized a quiet integration of lunch counters in the winter of 1961. The community involvement that came from these sit-ins gave the Civil Rights Movement the social backing it needed, taking the first steps for legal integration laws culminating in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Visit the Dr Pepper Museum’s Soda Fountain to experience Sit Down To Take Stand.

Sit-In Oral Histories
Local Civil Rights Sites Map
Teacher Lesson Plans